Pages

Monday, November 1, 2010

Revolutionizing Holiday Spending

Christmas is around the corner with the very cold breeze. We've been told that it's the coldest year here in Thailand. Malls and business establishments have started decorating for the highly commercialized Christmas season to attract more customers and therefore, more profits. But for us, we revolutionize our perspective of spending this season.


Since my kids were born, we as a family have never celebrated Christmas Day on the 25th of December. I explain to my kids that the Bible doesn't specify the exact birth-date of Jesus Christ. But we do celebrate the New Year for family thanksgiving for the past year and for welcoming the coming year with prayers and wishes. Thus, our holiday spending is more reduced. I also don't go for adorning the house with Christmas decors such as tall, shining Christmas trees as we were told once in the church about the pagan origin of such a practice. While Christmas decors brighten up the feeling for the season, our focus may be diverted to the material things around us making us tend to forget the real meaning of Christmas.
On our vacation with the kids this Christmas (I booked air tickets on promo), we plan to spend some time for rural kids who do not have opportunities to receive gifts and eat special foods. We've been doing this since my kids were still small. We don't usually spend it in the city where we live as most of the kids around us can afford to have lots of foods not only during parties. Urban kids also receive gifts often so their joy of receiving gift is not much as those with the rural kids who rarely receive one in their whole life. Thus for us,  it's more meaningful to celebrate the season by letting our kids experience the joy of giving simple gifts to the the lowly ones and feeding them without expecting for something in return. It is opposite to the concept of exchange gift and usual merriment our kids have in their school or in the place they live in. It is also easier to please the lowly kids so the price of the gifts we give them is not much. I remember my friend, Ms. G, complaining of a rich girl whom she gave an expensive gift but did not appreciate it. This Christmas season, what we need to remember is the birth of Jesus Christ on a lowly manger, not in a palace or an attractively adorned house.
What I'm saying here is, we can simplify our celebration of Jesus Christ's birth. It is not on the lavishness of the food we prepare and the gifts we exchange or give but it is how we express our thankfulness to God for sending His Son to earth to save us and to show us humility, simplicity and kindness to others without expecting something in return. So my spending plan this season is guided by these principles. I will have my children experience (again) the true meaning of Christmas with some gifts and food to the needy. We can buy more gifts and make more lowly ones happy by cutting decoration budget, unnecessary travels, new clothes and toys, and lavish food for us during the season especially at these times of continuing economic crisis and increasing global warming issues.

We can avoid over-drop in our budget if we reasonably spend this holiday season, within our budget. And we can make a difference if we follow the true reason for celebrating Christmas.

Please check out more interesting Marriage Monday posts related to this at Chrysalis by e-Mom.

17 comments:

April@The 21st Century Housewife said...

Sharing is very important at Christmas - thank you for sharing your holiday spending plan which blesses others.

nice A said...

@April, yes, sharing, not necessarily exchanging, is very important. Thanks or stopping by.

Guiding Light said...

We agree! Have a wonderfully blessed day!

nice A said...

@Guiding Light, thanks for making it here. God bless.

Anonymous said...

I am born Catholic, but I only follow what is being taught in Bible. I agree with your points:
1. No date specified in Bible for Christmas -- right.
2. Christmas tree has pagan origins -- right.

This December 25, I will travel somewhere. Yahoo!

bp said...

Enjoyed your post. Thanks for sharing about your family.

e-Mom said...

You have your Christmas well-planned! You definitely have Jesus at the forefront of your celebration. Every Christian should be as thoughtful as you.

Thanks for joining us for Marriage Monday today, Nice A.

nice A said...

@anonymous, you made me wonder who you are with your very good points. You can email me to reveal yourself, hehehe! Thanks for your visit.

@bp, thanks for stopping by.

@e-Mom, we don't want the kids to remember Santa Claus and the gifts they receive on Christmas instead of the true reason why we celebrate it. Thanks for being such a nice host of this thought-provoking meme.

Denise said...

Awesome plans.

nice A said...

@Denise, thank you.

Tami Boesiger said...

A simple Christmas sounds awesome to me. We plan to pare down our money spent this year too.

nice A said...

@Tami, thanks for liking the idea of simple Christmas. What is important is we make it really meaningful.

Nortehanon said...

I came from a family with humble beginnings. When I was young, we usually had nothing for celebration, only pancit and loaf of bread and a bottle of coke. Nothing more. But on those days, we were happy...very happy. Especially after we attend the church celebration.

gleenn said...

To celebrate with the lowly kids is much more fulfilling. Giving little gifts are much appreciated by the children who don't have much.

When you give gifts to the kids of the wealthy, the first thing they is is "how much?"

huh!

nice A said...

@Nortehanon, pancit and loaf of bread is not nothing, hehehe! In the old days and even now, a Pinoy handaan would not be complete without pancit:) What is important is, you're happy together as a family at Christmas.

@Gleenn, points very well said. Thanks.

kim said...

yeah, you're right! just because everybody does it doesn't mean you have to do it as well. whatever suits your beliefs and lifestyle... go! go go!

nice A said...

@kim, right, we need to be conscious on what we're trying to do or practice.
Thanks for coming back here:)

Post a Comment

Thank you for taking time to stop by my blog and for sharing your thoughts:)